The Lesser Known Murphy's Laws

Many people are familiar with the law that anything can go wrong will go wrong. The origin of this law starts in 1949 at Edward's Air Force Base.  Capt. Edward A. Murphy was working on Air Force Project MX981 which was designed to see how much deceleration a person could stand in a crash.

After discovering several problems with wiring done by a project technician, Murphy said, "If there is any way to do it wrong, he'll find it." A project manager overheard the conversation and added to a list of laws he was collecting.

 

It was soon picked up by everyone on the project and eventually leaked into the public after it was used in a press conference. Now it is known and used by the masses as Murphy's Law.

Curious about some of Murphy's lesser known laws? Here are some you might find interesting:

1. Light traveles faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.

2. Change is inevitable, except from a vending machine.

3. Those who live by the sword get shot by those who don't.

4. Nothing is foolproof to a sufficiently talented fool.

5. The 50-50-90 Rule: anytime you have a 50-50 chance of getting something right, there's a 90% probability you'll get it wrong.

6. If you lined up all the cars in the world end to end, someone would be stupid enough to try to pass them, fix or six at a time, on a hill, in the fog.

7. The things that come to those who wait will be a scraggly junk left by those who got there first.

8. The shin bone is a device for finding furniture in a dark room.

9. A fine is a tax for doing wrong. A tax is a find for doing well.

10. When you go into court, you are putting yourself in to the hands of 12 people who weren't smart enough to get out of jury duty.

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Source for Murphy's Law background: www.murphys-laws.com


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